Showing posts with label captioning. Show all posts
Showing posts with label captioning. Show all posts

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Captioning Friday's Faces from the Past

Getting to work on my 2017 resolutions, I found nice, large adhesive labels at my local office supply store to write captions for "faces from the past." Since nearly all of my photos are in archival-quality sleeves, the next step is to write captions and stick the labels to the back of the sleeves.

Above, my hand-printed captions for the two small photos that share one sleeve (shown at right). The subject is my father, Harold Burk (1909-1978), years before he met my mother. The lower photo shows him with my grandma, Henrietta Mahler Burk (1888-1954). 

Someday (in the far future) I hope to replace my hand-written labels with typed labels. For now, the main point is to caption these faces with as much as I know, for the sake of future generations.

In the past, I used the usual small, address-sized labels for captioning, sticking two or three on a sleeve if I had to a lot to say about a photo. But I was happy to find a larger size label in the store, as shown below.

Six to a sheet, plenty of room to write a few sentences or list a number of names. And these are heavy-duty labels, not likely to peel off the sleeves. So go ahead and snow! I'm ready to caption.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Wordless (Almost) Wednesday: Rose's Graduation Photo from 1914

My great-aunt Rose Farkas (1901-1993) had her portrait taken 102 years ago by the family's usual photographer, Gustav Beldegreen.

The date is carefully scratched above the Beldegreen name: June 25, 1914. Rose was 13 at the time.

On the back, the caption says this is her graduation from middle school school. (The diploma was a tip-off too.)

If only I could thank the ancestor who wrote the caption (about five decades later, I believe) for thinking ahead to let future generations know the identity and significance of this lovely photo! And that's why this isn't an entirely wordless Wednesday--because my thoughtful ancestor wrote down who, when, and why.