Showing posts with label Latvia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Latvia. Show all posts

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Mind the Gap--Between Children

NYC death cert of Wolf Mahler, who died at age 3
Only two weeks ago, I learned that my paternal great-grandparents (Tillie Jacobs Mahler and Meyer Mahler) had a young son (Wolf Mahler) who sadly died in 1894 in New York City.

Of course, Wolf's short life shouldn't have been entirely "new" news, since Tillie said on the 1900 US Census that she had 9 children in all, with 7 alive at the time. But I suspected the two children might have been born and died in Latvia, before Meyer came to America in 1885, followed by Tillie in 1886. Take a look at the gaps between children:

Henrietta, b. 1881 in Latvia
David, b. 1882 in Latvia
-------6-year GAP----- Children born/died before move to America?
Morris, b. 1888 in NYC
Sarah, b. 1889 in NYC
-------2-year GAP-----
Ida, b. 1891 in NYC
-------2-year GAP-----
Dora, b. 1893 in NYC
-------3-year GAP------
Mary, b. 1896 in NYC

Now I have Wolf Mahler's death cert in hand. I can confirm he was definitely part of my family. Sorry to say, he died of "acute Bright's disease" (meaning liver problems).

The next step was to place little Wolf in the correct gap between children born to his parents.
No birth date was given on Wolf's death cert, so I used Steve Morse's very handy page for determining the time between two events "in one step." As shown above, I plugged in the date of death as January 13, 1894. The cert said Wolf's age was 3 years, 4 months, and 3 days old. Thanks to Morse's calculator, I now know the boy was born on September 10, 1890. Ta-da, one gap accounted for, between Sarah and Ida.

While I look for clues to the second baby who died, I'll also make a Find a Grave memorial for Wolf and link him to his parents. Luckily, I can still use the old interface to do this!

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Sorting Saturday: Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Family's Story?

Tillie Jacobs Mahler
Watching the Hamilton documentary on PBS, I couldn't get one of Lin-Manuel Miranda's songs out of my mind: "Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story?" Who, the characters sang, would keep their stories alive?

As the genealogists of our generation, we're stepping up to tell our family's stories, and keeping the stories alive for future generations.

But we can't always sort out what the true story actually is. And I wonder, what story would our ancestors themselves tell if they could reach across time to us?

My family has two versions of a story about great-grandma Tillie Rose Jacobs (185_?-1952), born in Telsiai and married in Latvia to Meyer Elias Mahler (1861-1910) before coming to America before the turn of the 20th century.

In one version, Tillie lives to the age of 99. In the other, she is actually 100 when she passes away, but hasn't admitted her real age.

Which is the real story? Which way would she want to tell it to her descendants?

Either way, I know Tillie was a strong matriarch who outlived her husband by more than 40 years. The family often gathered at her Bronx apartment for holidays and other occasions.

Tillie had 14 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren at the time of her death--a large family to remember her and keep her memory alive through the ages.

Monday, September 14, 2015

Military Monday: David Mahler Had a Tattoo?! Yes, I Learned with a Click


David Mahler was the older of two brothers of my paternal grandma, Henrietta Mahler Burk.

Born in New York City, he worked in Hollywood for Columbia Pictures for many years, through the kindness of a Mahler in-law who was part of the studio's founding Cohn family.
I've researched David's background and I knew he was a "rigger" in Camden, NJ in 1918 when he registered for the WWI military. But I hadn't ever seen his WWII registration card--until today, when it turned up in a shaky leaf on Ancestry.

Page 1 of the document was quite informative: It confirmed that David was born in Riga, Latvia, and confirms his birthdate of March 15, 1882. Interestingly, David gave the name/address of a neighbor (or possibly a work colleague) for "someone who will always know your address."

If I had relied only on Ancestry's transcription, or simply stopped at page 1 of the registration card, I would never have learned what David looked like. Luckily, I can't resist reviewing the actual image of every document, and clicking to the image before and after to be sure that I've seen everything there is to see on my ancestors.

Sure enough, there was a page 2 image (not transcribed by Ancestry, of course), and it contained a physical description of my great uncle. He was 5' 4", 153 lbs, with salt-and-pepper hair and brown eyes.

Most interestingly, he had "DM" tattooed on his right arm, which might have been left over from his days as a "rigger." I can only imagine what his mother Tillie Jacobs Mahler would have thought of his tattoo, if she knew (I strongly suspect she didn't).

So always click to see the actual image and click to either side of it just in case there's more! Not to mention that seeing an ancestor's handwriting or printing can tell a story all on its own.

Monday, August 25, 2008

When did great-grandpa die?

One of the biggest mysteries of my family's genealogy has been finding out exactly when and where (and why) my father's grandfather died. Come to think of it, I wasn't sure exactly when and where he was born. When nearly every other Mahler ancestor died, he or she had a brief obit in the New York Times. Not Great-Grandpa Mahler.

But yesterday I reexamined the 1910 Census very carefully and sure enough, Great-Grandma Mahler was a widow in April, 1910. I checked NYC death records and found an entry for Great-Grandpa in January, 1910. Quick as you can say "ten bucks" I sent to NYC for the record.

Thanks to Ancestry, I already knew that Great-Grandpa had become naturalized in 1900. Out came my checkbook again and I sent for that record, as well. It will take weeks, but I'll know a lot more about my Mahler roots (in Latvia) when these two documents show up in the mailbox.